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Mame Display optimistations

The following is the extensive research and tinkering of Marshall Brooks. If you have any questions or comments feel free to mail him or me. Since this was only tested on his system any feedback with your experiences would be very much appreciated! You can also download this file as a Word document here and his second appendix with some updates and additional info here

 

How to make MAME display full screen without adjusting your monitor.

Background

This procedure will allow you to play games full screen in MAME without adjusting your monitor settings (height and width). I have used this procedure to set up over 50 games in MAME. All but about six of them display perfectly and the remaining six are about 95% perfect.

The procedure works by assigning games with similar original arcade resolutions to specific monitor modes. The procedure is setup for someone using MAME on a PC Monitor and graphics card. For an arcade monitor, I will recommend ArcadeOS, AdvanceMAME, or VSYNC MAME, and will let you reference the numerous websites covering these procedures.

This looks much more complex than it really is, because I have tried to cover all situations. Please read through the preliminary info first. Remember when you get to the procedure steps, you can skip the ones that don't apply to your situation.

 

What to expect - Why you should and who should not use this procedure

This procedure is useful if you hate adjusting Pac-Man because the display is half off the screen and then playing Centipede and not knowing where the game screen ends because the game display stops half an inch above the screen display. It will also be useful for someone using PC components in an arcade cabinet where ready access to the monitor position controls is not convenient.

Note that when I say that the games display full screen I mean that vertical games take up the entire screen vertically. They generally do not fill the screen horizontally. Making the games fill the screen horizontally will greatly reduce the number of games which benefit from this procedure. Depending on your hardware (monitor mainly), you can expect this procedure to help anywhere from all to about half of the games you play.

While this procedure should work for MAME32, if you're using MAME32 to avoid command lines in DOS this isn't the procedure for you. Also, if you just let MAME auto-select a display size, this isn't for you either. I don't know if any of these ideas are applicable to the Macintosh. Ditto for Linux. The general theory should work, so you can try it and see what happens.

Note: I use Dos MAME (PMAME, actually) in a Dos Box under Win '98. I use separate shortcuts for each game. I will use a front end to set the correct properties for a new game and then copy and rename an existing shortcut to create a shortcut to the new game. In some cases, I will run a batch file from the shortcut rather than the MAME executable. I sometimes also use different versions of MAME for different games. Using shortcuts allows the computer to decide which files to run to start MAME. If you use a different method, or a frontend, you may have to remember a lot of commands to make this method work.

 

DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS

    1. AGP & PCI - Format for graphics cards, AGP is newer and preferable, if your motherboard supports it.
    2. Arcade Resolution - The resolution the game ran on when it was in an arcade cabinet. This is shown on MAME's GAME INFO screen. It may be different than the display or selected resolution.
    3. Display Resolution - The actual resolution which the monitor is using. May be different than the arcade or selected resolution.
    4. Monitor Modes - Most newer monitors will remember size settings for a specified number of monitor modes. These are a combination of resolution e.g. 800x600, and refresh rate e.g. 75 Hz. Note that color depth does not affect monitor mode. (640x480 (256-color) @ 60 Hz and 640x480 (16.7-million colors) @ 60 Hz will display with the same display size parameters. This procedure works by assigning groups of games to specific monitor modes.
    5. OSD - On-screen display, for monitors. Most newer monitors will have a display which pops up and shows settings such as brightness, contrast, display size settings, etc.
    6. Refresh Rate - When I use this term, I am talking about the vertical refresh rate used by the monitor during game play. This will usually be different from the vertical refresh rate of the individual game which MAME emulates.
    7. Selected Resolution - The resolution selected from the command line when MAME is started, e.g. -400x300. May be different from the arcade or display resolution.
    8. TSR - Terminate and Stay Resident - Typically a small utility program, loaded and unloaded from the command line and invisible when it is running.
    9. VBE - Video Bios Extension - a standard for graphics cards.
    10. VESA - Video Engineering Standard Association (??) - an organization which develops standards for video hardware and software.
    11. HARDWARE CONSIDERATIONS

      I am assuming that you will set this procedure up to work on your existing hardware. I recommend trying this first. If the procedure will not work on your hardware, or if you are about to upgrade anyway, see APPENDIX C for a list of hardware recommendations. Note that the most important hardware consideration is the number of monitor modes.

      SOFTWARE CONSIDERATIONS

      For most users, the only software which might be necessary is UNIRFRSH and maybe SciTech Display Doctor. Win 95 users will also want to pick up Mulitres. Win 98 users will also benefit from Multires, but it is not required. See APPENDIX D for a complete discussion of the different software.

      LITTLE KNOWN (BUT IMPORTANT) FACTS AND ODDITIES

    12. When using DOS software in Windows 98 (and maybe Win 95, also) a dialog box will sometimes come up saying something like "This program requires MS-DOS mode to operate properly. Would you like windows to automatically create a shortcut to MS-DOS mode for this program? <OK> <NO>" ALWAYS answer NO to this prompt. Most of these programs run just fine if you create the shortcut yourself. I have gotten programs as old as Microprose F-19 Stealth Fighter and the Original Gunship (circa 1985) running with no problems under Win '98 using this method.
    13. After you create the Shortcut and run the program one time, set the following options to ensure the best performace (in Win 98, you can set this from the start menu, in Win 95, you will need to launch Windows Explorer and go to C:\Windows\Start Menu\Programs):
      1. Right click on the shortcut and click properties.
      2. Click the program tab at the top of the window.
      3. Click advanced.
      4. Check both "prevent MS-DOS programs from detecting windows" and "Suggest MS-DOS mode as necessary"
      5. Click OK
      6. Click the Misc tab.
      7. At the bottom, uncheck all the windows shortcut keys.
      8. Click OK.

      NOTE: This method will ensure that your screen saver doesn't pop up, or your computer shut down twenty minutes into a MAME session; and that you don't accidentally press a bad key combination and get sent to another Windows program.

    14. F11 will toggle the display of a game's speed. F9 will increase and F8 will decrease video frameskipping.
    15. Higher resolution settings and higher video refresh rates (display resolutions) will result in slower performance. I haven't experienced slowdowns greater than frameskip 2; e.g. from -frameskip 5 to -frameskip 7, but on a slower computer, which is already hurting for performance, this may be something to consider. On my computer, dropping the sampling rate for the sound card can significantly improve performance in some games. The sound becomes garbled if I drop below -sr 10000, though.
    16. Computer industry practice is to list monitor resolution as horizontal vs. vertical, e.g, 640x480. MAME's GAME INFO screen will list a game's arcade resolution as 288x224@60 Hz (V) for vertical. This is really 224x288 and that is how I will refer to it in the documentation that follows.
    17. For most games, the game info screen may be used to initially set the display size. Go to this screen, adjust the display so it looks right and play the game and the game image will remain inside the box display on the initial game info screen. For some games (Tron and Discs of Tron, notably) this does not work. For these games, run the game, pause it at the largest display area and then adjust the screen size.
    18. Several selected resolutions may produce screen images at the same display resolution. For example, 320x200, 320x240, 640x400, and 640x480, all display at 640x480@60 Hz with my graphics card. The screen image size is different for the various modes, but changing the height or width of one affects all the others.
    19. Several different arcade resolutions may display full screen at the same display resolution. For example, Tron (800x600 @ 30 Hz) and Discs of Tron (480x512 @ 30 Hz) both display properly at 800x600 selected resolution. I'm not sure why this is, since in many cases, the arcade resolutions are not proportional, but it works.
    20. Different graphics cards will produce different display resolutions for the same game at the same selected resolution.
    21. Different Video Drivers or a different Video Bios (SciTech Display Doctor) will produce different display resolutions for the same game at the same selected resolution.
    22. The same graphics card and driver will produce the same unique display resolution for any game at a selected resolution. For example, 1942 and any other game will always run at USER MODE @ 86 Hz if -1280x960 is selected on the command line (on my Diamond Stealth S220 graphics card).
    23. Generally speaking, horizontal monitor games tend to work better at higher resolutions (greater than -800x600) and vertical games tend to work better at lower resolutions (less than -800x600).
    24. Some games cannot be displayed properly at some selected resolutions. On certain games, if your monitor is set at vertical height equals 100 % and the game displays on 80 % of the screen vertically, there is nothing you can do other than select a different resolution.
    25. On my graphics card, some monitor modes are unselectable. MAME will not display at 640x480@75 Hz, regardless of the settings I choose in Unirfrsh. This is probably a function of the video bios not being VESA 3.0 compliant without the use of SciTech Display Doctor.
    26. On the KDS VS-7e and possibly other monitors with OSD, a 1-Hz variation in screen display is not significant. In other words, one selected resolution may show display resolution of 640x480 @ 60 Hz and another selected resolution may show display resolution of 640x480 @ 59 Hz, when in fact, these two settings are the same monitor mode.

 

HOW TO DO IT (FINALLY)

    1. The quick and dirty method:
      1. If you have a Diamond Stealth S220 graphics card, a KDS VS-7e monitor, a registered copy of Scitech Display Doctor, and you like to play the same 60 games that I do, you're in luck! Load and setup UNIRFRSH, select the same display settings that I show in APPENDIX E and you should be good to go!
      2. Actually, if you have a newer monitor and don't want to take the time to set everything up, you may be able to use the chart in APPENDIX E also. Just find your game (or one with the same arcade resolution) and use the same settings. The problem with this method is that if your monitor has less available modes than the VS-7E, games that worked correctly when you started setting them up them will not work correctly any more. (Because monitors generally remember the last however many modes encountered and then start losing the earlier modes.) Also if your graphics card will not support the same resolution you may need to adjust the mode settings.
    2. In a hurry:
      1. If you want you can just jump into things now and then optimize everything as you start running out of modes. To use this method, simply do steps C.(1); C(2)(a); C(4); and then pick up the procedure at C(6).
    3. The way to do it right:
      1. Print the two tables from APPENDIX B out or cut and paste them into your word processor.
      2. Determine the available monitor modes.
      3. Look at your monitor's documentation. Hopefully, near the back it will list the minimum and maximum horizontal scan rates. Write these down. Hopefully it will also list number of preset modes and number of memory modes. Edit table A from Appendix B to match these values.

        If you can't find this data in the monitor manual, (or can't find/never had the monitor manual), check the website of the monitor manufacturer. If it's not listed there, try calling the monitor's tech support number. This information is pretty critical to this procedure, so make every effort to come up with it.

        If you still can't find the information, you have two options, as follows:

        Don't worry about it and continue with the rest of the procedure. Be aware that at some point, the games that you set up first may lose their settings, because you have run out of monitor modes.

        If you are using Win 95 or Win 98, install multires (see Paragraph C(4)(c)). Select one resolution and refresh rate (call this MODE A). Set mode A to display full-screen. Now select another refresh rate, call this MODE B. Change the vertical size. Now change back to MODE A. If the display is still full size, change to MODE B again and then to a new refresh rate (or resolution) call this mode C. Change the vertical size and change back to A. If the display is still full-screen, continue this pattern (A, ABA, ABCA, ABCDA, ABCDEA, etc.) until the display is no longer full screen when you return to A. If you got to MODE E and the display was no longer full screen when you returned to A then your monitor supports 4 video modes in memory (B,C,D,and E). Unfortunately, there is no way to know which of these modes are preset modes, and which are user modes, so the total may be much higher.

        Determine if your graphics card supports VESA 3.0

        Download UNIRFRSH from http://home.student.utwente.nl/r.muller/unirefresh/download.html (This program is freeware).

        1. Unzip the files into any directory. (I use C:\mameres). Try to keep this directory near the top level and less than ten letters as you will need to access it from DOS.
        2. Exit to the DOS prompt.
        3. Type the following commands:
        4. cd\ <enter>
          cd mameres <enter>
          unirfrsh <enter>

        5. If you get a message that says something like "Can't find settings.dat", your video card supports VESA 3.0 and you can use Unirfrsh to gain additional video modes. At this point, perform the following:
          1. In the same directory, type setup <enter>
          2. From the menu, choose configure monitor.
          3. Enter the min and max horizontal and vertical refresh rate values for your monitor and press <enter>.
          4. From the main menu, select view/set refresh rates <enter>.
          5. Check the list of supported resolutions against the list in TABLE B and add any that are not shown.
          6. From the main menu, select Save settings and exit.
          7. Type exit to return to windows.
        6. If you get a message that says "need at least VBE 3.0", you will not be able to use unirfrsh without upgrading your video card or using SciTech display doctor. Don't worry about it now, unless as you continue, you find that your monitor supports more video modes than your card can produce and you need these modes for MAME.
        7. Determine the available video modes -

          Note: This step is much more helpful if your monitor OSD shows resolution and frequency. As the display resolution is determined by the graphics card, if you have a spare monitor with this type of OSD or you can borrow one, this part of the checkout will be much more useful.

          Note: On many monitors, a display of 1 Hz difference in refresh rate (i.e. 59 Hz instead of 60 Hz) may not be significant and may be the same mode.

          Note: Many of the lower resolution (below 640x480) modes may not display at the selected resolution. I believe the higher resolution modes all display at the selected resolution. However, on my system, even if I use Unirfrsh to force -1024 x768 @ 75 Hz, I get USER MODE @ 75 Hz.

        8. If your monitor has OSD, activate it and look for display properties or screen properties or resolution tabs. Some monitors will display resolution and refresh rates (1024x768@85 Hz), some will show only horizontal and vertical refresh rate info, and some will not show anything.
        9. If your monitor OSD shows both resolution and refresh rate, perform the following steps:
          1. Pick one game in mame (such as 1942).
          2. Run the game at each resolution shown in table B. For example:

            mame 1942 -320x200 <enter>
            mame 1942 -320x240 <enter>
          3. For each setting, if the mode is not supported (mame will display a screen saying "no zzzxzzz VESA mode found"), line through it in table B. If the game starts check the OSD and record the display resolution and refresh rate in the second column of Table B. If the mode matches one of the preset modes, write mame beside the corresponding mode in column A. Scale the display to be as close to full size as possible.
          4. As you go through the list, if a resolution is identical or very similar to a previous mode check the settings to be sure they don't match. For example, if -320x200 displays -640x480 @ 59 Hz and -320x240 displays -640x480@60 Hz, set the -320x240 display to full size and record the horizontal and vertical size settings, now run the game at -320x200 and see if the display is still full screen. If it is not, see if the size settings match the -320x240 settings. If they do, these are the same mode. Link them together on Table B. If you set one game to use one of these modes, you can still use the other mode for a different game, but if you have to adjust the screen settings, you will mess up the screen display for the first game.
          5. If you couldn't get data on the preset modes for your monitor earlier, after you set up the last video mode, go back and run the game at the first resolution setting. If the game still comes up full screen, your monitor supports at least as many memory modes as your graphics card produces in mame.
        10. If your monitor OSD displays vertical refresh rate data only, perform the following:
          1. Especially for Win 95 users, download multires.exe from http://entechtaiwan.com. This program is freeware. Scroll down the page and the download link is on the lower left side of the page.
          2. Copy the multires.exe file to any directory on your hard drive. Double-click on the program to run it. A computer screen icon will appear in the system tray. Right-click on the icon and you can select resolution and refresh rate for windows.
          3. Pick one game in mame (such as 1942).
          4. Run the game at each resolution shown in table B. For example:

            mame 1942 -320x200 <enter>
            mame 1942 -320x240 <enter>
          5. For each setting, if the mode is not supported (mame will display a screen saying "no zzzxzzz VESA mode found"), line through it in table B. If the game starts check the OSD and record the refresh rate in the second column of Table B. If the refresh rate is 60, 75, or 85 Hz, exit to Windows and use Multires to set the display size to full screen for the same refresh rate and a comparable mode. For example, for -320x???, or -640x??? use 640x480; for -400x300 or -800x600 use 800x600. Now run the game again and see if the display is still full size. If it isn't verify which windows mode mame is using and write mame next to the mode in Table A.
          6. As you go through the list, if a refresh rate is identical or very similar to a previous mode check the settings to be sure they don't match. For example, if -320x200 displays at 59 Hz and -320x240 displays at 60 Hz, set the -320x240 display to full size and record the horizontal and vertical size settings, now run the game at -320x200 and see if the display is still full screen. If it is not, see if the size settings match the -320x240 settings. If they do, these are the same mode. Link them together on Table B. If you set one game to use one of these modes, you can still use the other mode for a different game, but if you have to adjust the screen settings, you will mess up the screen display for the first game.
          7. If you couldn't get data on the preset modes for your monitor earlier, after you set up the last video mode, go back and run the game at the first resolution setting. If the game still comes up full screen, your monitor supports at least as many memory modes as your graphics card produces in mame.
        11. If your monitor OSD does not show display settings or you have no OSD, perform the following steps:
          1. Pick one game in mame (such as 1942).
          2. Run the game at each resolution shown in table B. For example:

            mame 1942 -320x200 <enter>
            mame 1942 -320x240 <enter>
          3. For each setting, if the mode is not supported (mame will display a screen saying "no zzzxzzz VESA mode found"), line through it in table B. If the game starts, place a checkmark next to the mode in Table B. Scale the display to be as close to full size as possible. If the display cannot be scaled full size, if possible, select an arbitrary size and record the horizontal and vertical size values in Table B.
          4. After you set the display size for each supported resolution. Run the game in the previous resolutions and see if the display is still full size. If any mode is not, resize it and then check the latest mode again. If it is no longer the same size, these resolutions produce the same mode. Link them together on Table B. If you set one game to use one of these modes, you can still use the other mode for a different game, but if you have to adjust the screen settings, you will mess up the screen display for the first game.
          5. If you couldn't get data on the preset modes for your monitor earlier, after you set up the last video mode, go back and run the game at the first resolution setting. If the game still comes up full screen, your monitor supports at least as many memory modes as your graphics card produces in mame.

          Evaluate your situation

          In Step 5, we will plan how to set-up MAME and whether any upgrades are required. At this point, you should know how many MAME modes your video card supports, whether it is VESA 3.0 compliant, and at least have a fair idea how many modes your monitor supports. The following ideas will be key to the following steps:

          If you know your monitor settings, your goal should be to use the preset modes first and leave as many user-specified settings as possible available for MAME. MAME may not be able to produce a given display setting, so the ones it does should be used for MAME. On the other hand, Windows or DOS games can easily be set to any refresh rate and performance will be largely unaffected.

          To get the greatest benefit from this procedure, you should set it up so that it can affect the most games or the games you play most often.

          First determine what settings are required for your other Windows and DOS programs. For example, I will occasionally use -1152x864 for graphics, I normally use -1024x768 almost all the time, I use 720x400 for DOS games (other than MAME), I use 800x600 and 640x480 for some programs. I don't use -1280x-1024, but since it is on Multires and could be easily set to the wrong values, I am not using it for MAME now. Set your modes up like this:

          Let's assume that 640x480 @ 60 Hz, 640x480 @ 75 Hz, and 640x480 @ 85 Hz are all preset modes for your monitor. Refer to Table A. If MAME displays at 640x480 @ 60 Hz for some games, then use Multires to set up Windows to use 640x480 @ 85 Hz at all color depths (if possible). This will allow MAME to use one of the preset modes and Windows to use one of the preset modes, thus none of the user modes will be taken up by these settings. Enter Windows (or the applicable program next to the mode used in Table A.

          Use the above logic to set the Windows (or DOS) refresh rate for all of your non-MAME programs and update Table A.

          Step C(5)(c) is optional. If you have a front-end (such as Arcade@Home) it will list arcade resolutions for each game. If not, this information is displayed in the Game Info screen which displays when MAME first runs a game.

          For each game that you play, write down the arcade resolution of the game. See which games use the same resolution. These games will use the same display resolution. Group games with similar resolutions together.

          (optional) - At this point you can start making some judgements regarding what you can gain with this procedure. I will show some of the examples:

          If your monitor only supports ten memory modes, you are using windows and need five resolutions for it, and you want to play all 2000 games in MAME, this procedure won't help much, you can optimize settings for the most common five game's settings, but beyond this, you will have to upgrade your monitor to increase the number of available memory modes.

          If your monitor supports 12 memory modes, you are only using the computer to play MAME in DOS, and you only play about 50 games in MAME, you should be able to get all the displays perfect with out changing any hardware.

          For most people you will be somewhere between these two. I will explain how to use your monitor to use all the available modes. After this, you will have to either buy a monitor which supports more modes, stop using some of the Windows modes, or display some of the games at less than the optimum size and set the size manually. Note that MAME will often have a mode which displays at eighty percent of the optimum size, which is usually adequate.

          Set-up the games -

          First, all the Vector games display best at higher resolution, if you enjoy these games pick a game like asteroids, set the display to -1024x768 and adjust the monitor so that the setup screen is full size. Use this setting for all vector games. Write the mode used in Table A.

          Next you will want to add either games which you play a lot of that use the same arcade settings, or games like Centipede which do not have a visibly defined playfield.

          Set-up and add games as follows:

          Start the game and record the arcade resolution. See if any of the games you have set up already are using the same resolution. If so, run the game at this resolution and the display should be fine. Add the game to Table B and continue with the next game.

          Test the games at each resolution to which games have been assigned. For example, since vector games use -1024x768, try this setting first. If another set of games is using -400x300, then try this setting next. Do not adjust the display settings or you will mess up the settings for the other games that you have already set-up. If the game looks full-screen at any setting, use this resolution, record the data in Table B and continue with the next game.

          Test the game at all of the remaining resolutions. For the resolution which looks best, set the display to make the game full screen and, record the data in Table B and continue with the next game.

          At some point, you may have to shift game resolutions. For example, on my system, Sky Shark plays well at -320x240 or -1024x768. I originally set the game to play at 320x240. However, OutRun would not work at -1024x768 and worked at -320x240, so I set OutRun to play that way and changed Sky Shark to use -1024x768.

          At some point, you may have to change the display settings to optimize all games. For example, I originally set Konami GT and the other 256x224 games to run at -1152x864 and horizontal size of 87% and vertical size of 80%. Missile Command (256x231) was a little too large at this setting. However, changing the vertical size to 77% made the game full screen. Konami GT is no longer completely full screen but it is very close.

          Continue setting up games until you have either used up all the available monitor modes, or the remaining games don't reach full screen at any resolution.

          The Unirfrsh trick

          NOTE: On my system, UNIRFRSH only works for true resolutions, settings like -400x300 which displays at -800x600 will not work and the game will not even start if UNIRFRSH is loaded. I think this is due to my video card not being VBE 3.0 compliant, but I can't verify this. (I used SciTech Display Doctor for these sections).

          At this point, you may have four or five monitor modes not being used and many games which are not optimized because they can't display full screen at the available resolutions. Here’s how to fix them.

          Pick a game and test the resolutions and find the one that looks best (even if another game is set up to use it and therefore, it can't be used to get a full screen display). For example, let's say Tron displays best at -800x600, but Pac-Man and many other games are already using this resolution. We will use UNIRFRSH to set up a unique -800x600 monitor mode for TRON.

          UNIRFRSH should have been configured in steps C.(3)(a) through C.(3)(e). If you skipped these steps, go back and configure it now.

        12. Exit to the DOS prompt.
        13. Type the following commands:
        14. cd\ <enter>
          cd mameres <enter>
          unirfrsh <enter>
          setup <enter>

        15. From the main menu, select view/set refresh rates <enter>.
        16. Select the desired resolution and select enter to set the desired refresh rate. Set the rate to something that will not conflict with Windows or the other game settings. For example, on my system, since Pac-Man uses -800x600 @ 56 Hz, 1942 uses -800x600 @ 75 Hz, and Windows uses -800x600 at 85 Hz, set the refresh rate for -800x600 to 60 Hz for use by Tron.
        17. From the main menu, select Save settings and exit.

          Exit back to windows.

          Create a directory called C:\MAMEBAT (or another name, if you prefer. This will be used for storing batch files.

          Start WordPad.

          Type the followings commands into the program. (Use <enter> to move to the next line.) Use your appropriate directories if they are different.

          cd\
          c:\mameres\unirfrsh
          cd mame
          mame.exe tron -800x600 <other command line options>
          c:\mameres\unirfrsh -u

          Save this file as an ASCII Text file in C:\Mamebat. Use Tron.bat for the file name.

          Run Tron.bat and set the display to show full screen.

          If you need to run other games at other -800x600 refresh rates, (your video card only has two or three supported modes, for example), you can copy the UNIRFRSH files to another directory (MAMERES2, for example) and reference this directory in your batch files.

          On SciTech Display Doctor (optional)

          As I will cover in the appendix, I am not fond of SciTech Display Doctor. However, in case you decide to use it, I will cover the installation and setup of the program here.

          Download the DOS version of the program from SciTech's web site.

          Run the .exe file. The program will install to C:\SDD.

        18. Exit to the DOS prompt.
        19. Type the following commands:

cd\ <enter>
cd SDD <enter>
univbe <enter>

When it is run for the first time, the program will perform a test of all video modes. Turn off your monitor and press enter to let the test proceed.

Type univbe -u to remove the program from memory.

Using the example above, with SDD, the batch file would read as follows:

cd\
c:\SDD\univbe
c:\mameres\unirfrsh
cd mame
mame tron -800x600 <other command line options>
c:\mameres\unirfrsh -u
c:\SDD\univbe -u

You are all set! MAME ON!!! Read the appendixes for more helpful information.

Click here for appendix 1 Additional infos and FAQ
Click here for appendix 2 Updated info on the software tools Marshall is using and a huge list with individual game settings